Old House Gardens
From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
Though preservation is our mission, bulbs drop out of our catalog every year.

Sometimes it’s because the harvest was too small. Sometimes it’s because they’re widely available elsewhere and don’t need our help. And sometimes it’s because we’ve lost our only known source due to severe weather (cold, drought, etc.), health problems (a debilitating stroke), or economic woes (small farmers are always at risk).

The good news is that, in time, we’re often able to return these bulbs to our catalog. So here’s a list of many we’ve offered in the past. For an alert the moment they’re available again, subscribe to our free email newsletter. Or to find a similar bulb, try our easy Advanced Bulb Search.

Fall-planted:     Crocus       Daffodils       Hyacinths       Lilies       Peonies       Tulips       Diverse

Spring-planted:     Cannas       Dahlias       Daylilies       Gladiolus       Iris       Diverse

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Crocus We Hope To Offer Again
tommasinianus ALBUS, 1847
Radiant against the moist dark earth of spring, these slender-petaled stars are as eager and prolific as all of our tommies. You’ll enjoy multiple blooms per corm, and a “Starry Night” that gets better every year. C. tommasinianus, Zones 5b-8a(8bWC). Last offered in 2008. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
LITTLE DORRITT, 1943
Rated one of the “most rodent-resistant” in trials at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, this luminous, pale amethyst gem is named for the Dickens heroine born in a gloomy prison yet destined for the sunshine. C. vernus, zones 4-7, from Holland. Last offered in 2007. We hope to offer it again soon. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
PAULUS POTTER, 1920
“Ruby-purple,” says Roy Genders. “Almost magenta,” says E.A. Bowles. “Splendid!” says Louise Beebe Wilder. This vibrant, vanishing jewel – lost to us for years but now back thanks to one determined Dutch grower – is the rosiest purple of all the traditional crocus. (To add to its pleasures, learn about the painter it’s named for.) C. vernus, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Last offered web-only in 2012. Healthy stock of this great old crocus has become very hard to get, but we hope to offer it again in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
PETER PAN, 1943
When ‘Snowbunting’ fades, this magic boy takes over, extending the season’s sparkle. Pair it with‘Negro Boy’ for a dramatic “Ebony and Ivory.” C. vernus, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2012 when it went “commercially extinct.” Although bulbs by this name may be offered elsewhere, all are counterfeit look-alikes. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
PURPUREUS GRANDIFLORA, 1870
True stock! Deep, vivid purple, this Victorian relic is the oldest purple C. vernus still available. Why has it outlasted all of its peers? Grow it and you’ll know: great beauty and wonderful VIGOR. Zones 4-7, from Holland. Last offered in 2003. Though bulbs by this name are offered elsewhere, all are counterfeits. The true ‘Purpureus Grandiflora’ is “commercially extinct.”
REMEMBRANCE, 1925
This shimmering lilac is as close to perfect as any crocus we’ve ever grown. After 20 years, it still moves us. Zones 4-7, from Holland. Last offered in 2005. Widely available elsewhere.
Daffodils We Hope To Offer Again
ANCIENT TRUMPETS        Sampler
There’s more to trumpet daffodils than the stiff, over-sized honkers offered by every chain store. Look to the past and you’ll find a variety of bright, graceful, early-blooming trumpets that have delighted gardeners for centuries. We’ll send you 1 bulb each of 5 of the best: 1 N. pseudonarcissus, Lent lily (by 1200), 1 ‘Maximus’ (a.k.a. ‘Trumpet Major’, 1576), 1 bi-colored ‘Princeps’ (1830), 1 ‘Golden Spur’ (1885), and 1 ‘King Alfred’ (true stock! 1899). For zones 5a-8aS/10WC. This was a special, one-time-only sampler offered in 2010. Sorry!
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Old House Gardens
536 Third St., Ann Arbor, MI 48103.
phone: 734-995-1486
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