Old House Gardens
From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs

Throughout our site, these treasures are highlighted with a green or purple bar and the word Rarest. Most you can’t get anywhere else in North America, and the rest you’d be very hard-pressed to find. That makes them extra-endangered – and extra-exciting in the garden.

Capitals indicate bulbs that are NEW or returned to our catalog after a hiatus.

Rarest from FALL 2013 Planting
Admiration, 1912 — tafetta-silk and amber
Albatross, 1891 — propeller-like petals
April Queen, 1938 — bright, flame-kissed cup
Argent, 1902 — bright double with arms akimbo
Brilliancy, 1906 — luminous Arts-and-Crafts-era beauty
Broughshane, 1938 — amber-white Irish trumpet
Butter and Eggs, 1777 — the classic cottage-garden double
Camellia, 1930 — chiffon yellow petals piled high
Cassandra, 1897 — rare Victorian pheasant’s-eye
Colleen Bawn, 1885 — demure, nodding white trumpet
Croesus, 1912 — gold and silver coins
Daphne, 1914 — ADS 2008 Best Historic Daffodil
Early Pearl, 1899 — early, fragrant, and luminous
Emperor, 1869 — one of history’s Top Ten daffodils
Feu de Joie, 1927 — free-spirited semi-double
Firebird, 1940 — Grand Rapids’ finest
Firetail, 1910 — is its cup truly RED?
Glory of Lisse, 1901 — one of the best of the poets
Golden Spur, 1885 — extra-early Victorian trumpet
Horace, 1894 — poet of carpe diem
Horn of Plenty, 1947 — long, dramatic bells
Insulinde, 1921 — graceful, exuberant double
John Evelyn, 1920 — Copeland’s best?
King Alfred, 1899 — true stock!
Louise de Coligny, 1940 — sweet-scented apricot beauty
Lucifer, 1890 — angel wings, devilish cup
moschatus, 1604 — demurely nodding “Swan’s Neck”
Mrs. Langtry, 1869 — crinkled canary cup ringed with gold
Niveth, 1931 — Thalia’s elegant, uptown cousin
Princeps, 1830 — graceful white and yellow wildling
Rose of May, 1950 — rose-like shape and fragrance
Twink, 1925 — a classic southern double
Verger, 1930 — as brilliant as a cathedral window
White Lady, 1897 — Victorian lady with a parasol
Will Scarlett, 1898 — dazzling groundbreaker
Bismarck, 1875 — long-lived perennial
Double Yellow, Ophir, 1827? — the world’s only double yellow
King of the Blues, 1863 — distinctively slim and dark
Marie, 1860 — deepest indigo-purple
Queen of the Blues, 1870 — soft, silvery blue
Roman Blue, 1562 — wildflowery, and it multiplies!
Roman Pink, 1573 — wildflowery, pink, and wonderful
Vuurbaak, 1948 — deepest rose
Absalon, 1780 — chocolate and chestnut on gold
Black and White, 1920 — dark purple flames on white
Blondine, 1956 — Do blondes really have more fun?
Clara Butt, 1889 — once the world’s favorite
clusiana, 1607 — original WHITE & red
Dillenburg, 1916 — wonderfully fragrant
Duc van Tol Red and Yellow, 1595 — ancient, landmark miniature
Duc van Tol Rose, 1700 — tiny pink and white ballerina
Elegans Alba, 1895 — fragrant vanilla
Elegans Rubra, 1872 — stark simplicity
Gerbrand Kieft, 1951 — named for one of our kind of guys
Gloria Nigrorum, 1837 — dark violet splashed on cream
Greuze, 1891 — rich, deep purple
Harlequin, 1912 — misted with pink
Insulinde, 1914 — enjoy its enchanting transformation
James Wild, 1890 — gloriously amber-brown
Lac van Rijn, 1620 — ancient crown of purple-red and ivory
Mabel, 1856 — barmaid’s delight?
Mirella, 1953 — buff-rose and silvery pink
Pompadour, 1929 — as if blushing in slow motion
Prince of Austria, 1860 — fragrant and enduring
Purperkroon, 1785 — dark purplish red, aka ‘The Moor’
Royal Sovereign, 1820 — mahogany on gold
Silver Standard, 1760 — dazzling red on white
Spaendonck, 1893 — staff favorite
The Lizard, 1903 — flames of lilac and rose on cream
Tournesol Red and Yellow, 1769 — colorful and lovely
Wapen van Leiden, 1760 — did George Washington grow this?
Zomerschoon, 1620 — true relic of Tulipomania
antique freesia, 1878 — super fragrant naturalizer

Rarest for SPRING 2014 Planting
Andries’ Orange, 1936 — flower arranger’s delight
Arab Queen, 1949 — a whirlwind of autumn leaves
atropurpurea, 1789 — wild original, dark and velvety
Bloodstone, 1939 — as brilliant as the ancient gem
Clair de Lune, 1946 — elegant and wildflowery
Glorie van Heemstede, 1947 — a buttery yellow flower
Golden Heart, 1955 — warm sunburst of beauty
Klankstad Kerkrade, 1954 — spiky poofs of primrose
Lavender Chiffon, 1957 — cool, man, cool!
Lavengro, 1953 — soft, dreamy lavender
Lutt Wichen, 1941 — gardenia-flowered “ground-cover” dahlia
Madame Stappers, 1947 — chocolate foliage, radiant flowers
Mrs. I. De ver Warner, 1920 — saved by Kentucky farm family
Nellie Broomhead, 1897 — Victorian gem, from Japan
Old Gold, 1947 — flickering like a bonfire
Prince Noir, 1954 — ruffled, dark burgundy cactus
Princesse Louise de Suede, 1947 — chic, indescribable color
Prinzessin Irene von Preussen, 1912 — rare white, serene and charming
Rosemary Webb, 1956 — abundant, peony-like blooms
Sellwood Glory, 1951 — dark burgundy on silver
Stolz von Berlin, 1884 — pink perfection
Tommy Keith, 1892 — ruby and ivory
White Aster, 1879 — world’s oldest garden dahlia
Winsome, 1940 — shocking beauty
Wisconsin Red, 1910? — pass-along ruby-red
York and Lancaster, 1915? — mysterious history
Apricot, 1893 — the very first
Circe, 1937 — chiffon yellow classic by Stout
Corky, 1959 — sweet little flower with famous friends
Gold Dust, 1905 — from the dawn of daylily breeding
Ophir, 1924 — trumpet-shaped, American-bred pioneer
Orangeman, 1902 — mango-colored stars, extra old
Theron, 1934 — dark landmark
Allegro, 1965 — rose-ruby with smoky undertones
Bibi, 1954 — vibrant pink and rose batik
Bluebird, 1968 — petite All-American
Caribbean, 1957 — lavender skies and sandy beaches
Contentment, 1957 — misty, lavender-pink
Dauntless, 1940 — Lauren Bacall in pink
Firedance, 1968 — like a cymbidium orchid
Green Lace, 1961 — daintily ruffled and cute as a button
King Solomon, 1966 — sumptuous burgundy trimmed with silver
La Coruna, 1957 — ruby and smoke
Lilac & Chartreuse, 1960 — unique coloring
Lucky Star, 1966 — a truly fragrant glad!
Mexicana, 1967 — spring green and complex
Starface, 1960 — rapturously beautiful
Sunset Sky, 1965 — small, ruffled, and early-blooming
antique montbretia, 1879 — the antique original
Ehemanii canna, 1863 — arching sprays of dangling flowers

See our WEB-ONLY bulbs.

See WHAT’S NEW this year.

See our past and present BULBS OF THE YEAR.

For our print catalog click here or
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536 Third St., Ann Arbor, MI 48103.
phone: 734-995-1486
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