Old House Gardens
From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
Though preservation is our mission, bulbs drop out of our catalog every year.

Sometimes it’s because the harvest was too small. Sometimes it’s because they’re widely available elsewhere and don’t need our help. And sometimes it’s because we’ve lost our only known source due to severe weather (cold, drought, etc.), health problems (a debilitating stroke), or economic woes (small farmers are always at risk).

The good news is that, in time, we’re often able to return these bulbs to our catalog. So here’s a list of many we’ve offered in the past. For an alert the moment they’re available again, subscribe to our free email newsletter. Or to find a similar bulb, try our easy Advanced Bulb Search.

Fall-planted:     Crocus       Daffodils       Hyacinths       Lilies       Peonies       Tulips       Diverse

Spring-planted:     Cannas       Dahlias       Daylilies       Gladiolus       Iris       Diverse

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CHESTINE GOWDY, 1913
This fragrant, “tri-colored” peony is decidedly different — and lovely. Its soft pink outer petals frame a flurry of creamy white inner petals that open to reveal a central tuft of pink flecked with crimson. Wow! It’s free-flowering, too, with strong stems for garden and bouquets. 2-3 eye roots (the biggest we can get this year), 30”, zones 3-7S/8WC, from Iowa. Last offered in 2012. We offer a rotating selection of peonies. For an alert the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for our email newsletter.
DUCHESSE DE NEMOURS, 1851
Its rich fragrance and exquisite beauty have made this French icon a favorite for over 150 years. Opening as “creamy chalices” (Harding, 1917) with a golden glow inside, its abundant flowers develop into perfect white cumulus clouds. RHS AGM winner, strong stems, 3-5 eye roots, 34-38”, mid-season, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Iowa.Last offered in 2013. We offer a rotating selection of peonies. For an alert the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for our email newsletter.
EARLY SCOUT, 1952
Lacy-leafed, just two feet tall, very early blooming, and winner of both the APS Gold Medal and Award of Landscape Merit, this is a very special peony. Its striking foliage and early bloom — 2-3 weeks before most peonies — come from P. tenuifolia, the fern-leaf peony. It never needs staking, increases vigorously, and blooms profusely. 3-5 eye roots, 20-24”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Illinois. Last offered in 2013. We may offer it again periodically.
FELIX CROUSSE, 1881
In Victorian days, the world’s finest new peonies were coming from France, and passionnant ‘Felix’ is still one of the best. With neat, abundant flowers of vivid, juicy raspberry, it combines especially well with pink peonies and the blues of larkspur and baptisia. 3-5 eye roots, 30-32”, zones 3-7S/8WC, from Iowa.Last offered in 2009. We offer a rotating selection of peonies. For an alert the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for our email newsletter.
FRANCES WILLARD, 1907
Named for the social reformer who urged women to “Do everything,” this fragrant, Brand-bred classic won high praise from Alice Harding in 1923 for “ the pearliness of its delicate cream-and-blush coloring,” its “stiff, upright” stems, and roots that “increase well and rejoice the heart of the gardener.” 3-5 eye roots, 30-34”, mid, zones 3-7S/8WC, Iowa. Last offered in 2012. An Iowa peony farmer is propagating it for us and we plan to offer it again periodically. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
GOLDEN DAWN, 1923
Increasingly hard to find, this distinctive peony looks like a sunrise when it first opens, with cloud-like outer petals and a froth of glowing, butter-yellow inner petals that mature to white. It was bred by Walter Gumm of tiny Remington, Indiana, whose peony collection included a staggering 1100 varieties. 3-5 eye roots, 32”, zones 3-7S/8WC, from Iowa. Last offered in 2011. We hope to offer it again.
HERMIONE, 1932
One of the most fragrant peonies of all, this hard-to-find beauty by the great Hans Sass of Nebraska is a lovely, soft, apple-blossom pink. Cut when the buds are in the “soft marshmallow” stage — just before they start to open — and your house will be filled with fragrance for a week or more. 3-5 eye roots, 36-38”, mid-late season, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Iowa.Last offered in 2013. We offer a rotating selection of peonies. For an alert the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for our email newsletter.
HUMEI, 1810
America’s love affair with peonies started here. Over the past 200 years, thousands of varieties of Paeonia lactiflora have graced our gardens, but in 1810 there were only three, freshly arrived from China. Today ‘Humei’ is still ruggedly handsome, watermelon-pink, cinnamon-scented, and — for gardeners like us — a thrill. 3-5 eye roots, 30-32”, late, zones 3-7S/8WC, from Iowa. Last offered in 2011. We hope to offer it again.
KRINKLED WHITE, 1928
The new APS Award of Landscape Merit honors peonies that are especially fine garden plants, such as this glorious single that blooms abundantly and never needs staking. It’s superb in bouquets, too, where you can enjoy its dazzling center and crinkly, undulating petals up close. 3-5 eye roots, 30-32” mid-season, zones 3-7S/8WC.Last offered in 2010. We offer a rotating selection of peonies. For an alert the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for our email newsletter.
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