Old House Gardens
From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs

Fall-planted:     Crocus       Daffodils       Hyacinths       Lilies       Peonies       Tulips       Diverse

Spring-planted:     Cannas       Dahlias       Daylilies       Gladiolus       Iris       Diverse

Page 7 of Tulips: Lost Forever?       << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next >>
ROSAMUNDE HUYKMAN, 1895
This ethereal tulip is snowy white delicately blushed with pink and lilac-rose. No two are exactly alike, and the coloring spreads and intensifies as each tulip matures, like a pink and white sunrise, adding to the enchantment. But don’t be fooled by its gossamer looks — only the strong survive for as long as it has. Single Early, 10-12”, zones 4b-7aS/7bWC, from the Hortus. Last offered web-only in 2012. We’ll probably offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
ROSE GRIS-DE-LIN, 1860
This lovely rose and white tulip became one of Victorian America’s best-loved bulbs, with countless catalogs and books calling it “beautiful,” “delicate,” and “most desirable.” Plant it up front and prepare to be charmed. Single Early, 6-8”, zones 4b-7a, from the Hortus. Last offered web-only in 2008. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
SCHRENKII, 1585
No taller than a crocus and almost as early, this wild tulip is a cheery little flame of spring. When it bloomed in a display of our historic tulips on Park Avenue, it inspired Verlyn Klinkenborg of The New York Times to write a terrific editorial-page column about it. Parent of the whole ‘Duc van Tol’ clan, it’s a good stand-in for colonial ‘Duc van Tol Red and Yellow’ — and wonderful in its own right. 4-6”, zones 4-7, from Holland. Last offered in 2006. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
STRIPED SAIL, 1960
Although this looks like a very old broken tulip, it’s actually a virus-free, genetically streaked Rembrandt tulip introduced in 1960. And though we usually scorn modern Rembrandt tulips as crude – and we’ve never offered a tulip this young before – when we saw ‘Striped Sail’ in bloom at the Hortus Bulborum, its dramatic beauty won us over. ’Nuff said? Mid-season blooming Triumph, 14”, zones 4b-7bS/7bW, from the Hortus. Last offered web-only in 2008. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
THEEROOS, 1890
The fragrance of “TAY-rohs” shouldn’t have surprised us since its Dutch name means “tea rose,” but give it a sniff and we bet you’ll be surprised at how great it smells, too. And it’s a treat for the eyes — opening pale primrose faintly misted with pink, it gets rosier and more richly speckled every day. Double Early, 12”, zones 4b-7a(7bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2013. We hope to offer it again soon. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
THOMAS MORUS, 1820
This very rare, sweetly scented tulip is an intriguing, rusty color that catalogs over the years have struggled to describe: “nankeen-orange,” “terra-cotta shaded gold,” “orange shaded with buff,” even “light brown.” It was offered by New York’s Linnaean Botanic Garden nursery in 1830, and nearly a century later it was a “special favorite” of garden diva Louise Beebe Wilder. Its name honors the Renaissance statesman, author of Utopia, and saint beheaded for opposing Henry VIII. Last offered in 2006, Single Early, 12-14”, zones 4b-7aS/7bWC, from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2011. We hope to offer it again soon. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
URSA MINOR, 1929
Named for the “Little Bear” constellation, this bright, early tulip is deep yellow with an impossibly thin, all but invisible outline of red, as if the edges were glowing from inner heat. Tulips are grown on more than 26,000 acres in the Netherlands, but this endangered gem accounts for little more than one thousandth of one percent of the total crop. Single Early, 12”, zones 4-7, from Holland. Last offered in 2002. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
VAN DER NEER, 1860
After gracing American gardens for 150 years, this rosy-purple relic went “commercially extinct” in 2012. The good news is the Hortus Bulborum is preserving it, which means we can continue offering it, albeit no longer at mainstream prices. A long-time Victorian favorite for ribbon beds and carpet-bedding, it’s just as striking in modern mixed borders, too. Single Early, 10-12”, zones 3-7S/8WC, from Hortus Bulborum. Last offered web-only in 2012. We're sad to say that 'Van der Neer' is now “commercially extinct.”
VUURVLAM, 1897
If you’re bored with red tulips, try this unique beauty from the Hortus Bulborum. Its radiant color will draw your eye, but what really sets it apart is its antique, goblet-like shape with its elegantly curling, flame-like petals (in Dutch its name means “fire-flame”). Though a favorite in stylized Victorian carpet-bedding, it’s full of the purity and grace of a wildflower. Single Early, 10-12”, zones 3-7, from the Hortus. Last offered in 2005. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
WEST POINT, 1943
Recalling both jesters’ caps and the first Turkish tulips that came to Europe in the 1500s, ‘West Point’ has narrow, pointed petals that curve back gracefully and dramatically. That and its many other good qualities led the RHS in 1995 to honor it with an Award of Garden Merit as a plant that should be in every garden (yes, including yours!). Lily-flowered, 20”, zones 3-7, from Holland. Last offered in 2008. Widely available elsewhere.
Page 7 of Tulips: Lost Forever?       << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next >>
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