Though preservation is our mission, bulbs drop out of our catalog every year.

Sometimes it’s because the harvest was too small. Sometimes it’s because they’re widely available elsewhere and don’t need our help. And sometimes it’s because we’ve lost our only known source due to severe weather (cold, drought, etc.), health problems (a debilitating stroke), or economic woes (small farmers are always at risk).

The good news is that, in time, we’re often able to return these bulbs to our catalog. So here’s a list of many we’ve offered in the past. For an alert the moment they’re available again, subscribe to our free email newsletter. Or to find a similar bulb, try our easy Advanced Bulb Search.

Fall-planted:     Crocus       Daffodils       Hyacinths       Lilies       Peonies       Tulips       Diverse

Spring-planted:     Cannas       Dahlias       Daylilies       Gladiolus       Iris       Diverse

ADMIRATION, 1912        
With an amber-orange cup ringed by golden-white petals like “the soft taffeta silk which in the old days was known as sarsenet” (Wayside Gardens, 1936), this elegant poetaz is now one of the oldest of that hardy, cluster-flowered clan. And its fragrance is delicious! 8 Y-O 14-16”, zones 6a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
ALBATROSS, 1891        
With propeller-like petals and a frilled cup dipped in orange, this late Victorian treasure outshines its sibling ‘Seagull’ and was proudly described by the immortal Rev. Engleheart as “one of my finest and most brilliantly colored” creations. 3 W-YYO, late-mid, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2015. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
ARGENT, 1902        
“The very best of all double daffodils”? Yes, according to the great E.A. Bowles who, in 1914, raved about its “particularly graceful outline” and the “charming mingling of its silver and gold.” With long white petals thrusting out of a flurry of short, bright, yellow ones, ‘Argent’ is bursting with spring’s exuberance. From a cross of ‘Ornatus’ and super-strong ‘Van Sion’. 4 W-Y, 14-16”, zones 4a-7b(9WC), from Holland. Last offered in 2015. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. Please subscribe to our newsletter for an alert.
BERYL, 1907        
In daffodil shows across the country, this graceful little shooting star wins more ribbons for Best Historic Daffodil than any other. Its up-swept petals mature from almost-buff to white, while its dainty golden cup is kissed with orange. In the 1930s, garden diva Louise Beebe Wilder praised it as “neat and charming.” 6 W-YYO, 12-14”, zones 5b-8a(10bWC), Holland. Last offered in 2006.
CAMELLIA, 1930        
With its neatly layered petals of pale, dreamy, chiffon-yellow petals, this rare double daffodil really does look something like a camellia. It’s a sport of the legendary ‘Emperor’ and especially beautiful up close — which led connoisseur Michael Jefferson-Brown to name it one of the fifteen best daffodils for flower arrangers. 4 Y-Y, 18-20”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
CASSANDRA, 1897        
This very rare Victorian pheasant’s eye is another treasure from the illustrious Rev. Engleheart who gave the world ‘Beersheba’, ‘Lucifer’, ‘White Lady’, and many others. In 1905, the British Saturday Review praised its petals of “driven snow,” cup edged with “deep madder,” and “heart of pure green.” 9WC-GWYR, 18-20”, zones 4a-7a(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
CHINITA, 1922        
With a unique look and fabulous scent, ‘Chinita’ is the love child of a pheasant’s eye and a tazetta such as Avalanche. Its flat, ribbed, golden eye is circled with orange, but what really sets it apart are its pale amber-to-cream petals. From the moment it first bloomed for us, we wanted to share it with you! 8Y-YYR, 21-23”, zones 6a-8a(10bWC), from California. Last offered in 2009. We hope to offer it again someday. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
COLLEEN BAWN, 1885        
With its demure swan’s-neck pose and “high-shouldered” petals that arch forward to embrace the trumpet, this sweet little Victorian daffodil is close kin to N. moschatus and the classic “Silver Bells” daffodil that graces so many old Southern gardens. Its lilting Irish name was the title of one of the 19th century’s most popular plays. It means, fittingly, “fair-haired girl.” 1 W-W, 10-12”, zones 5b-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
CONSPICUUS, 1869        
Delicate looking but strong-growing, this graceful flower – long known as ‘Barrii Conspicuus’ – was one of the landmark achievements of the Victorian daffodil renaissance. A clump in bloom, with its fluttering petals and crinkled, orange-rimmed cup, may well remind you of a host of antique butterflies. Learn more. 3 Y-YYO, 14-16”, zones 4a-7b(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2015. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
CROESUS, 1912        
With ruffled disks of orange-gold set against smooth, elegantly rounded petals of cream, this classic beauty is named for the fabulously wealthy King Croesus of Lydia who minted the world’s first coins. Plant it and you’ll be rich in beauty for years to come! 2 Y-YYO, 17-19”, zones 4a-7b(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
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