SHIRLEY TEMPLE, 1937        
Named for the curly-haired moppet who brightened spirits during the Great Depression, this award-winning double is more commonly known as ‘Snowball’ today. With an ivory ruff of outer petals and a center rosette touched by sunshine, it’s informal, refreshing, and lightly scented. 4 W-W, 18-20” late-middle blooming, zones 4a-7b/9WC, from Holland. Last offered in 2009. We could special order it for you.
SHOT SILK, 1931        
An improved ‘Thalia’ (is that possible?), this rare, silky-smooth beauty has a creamy white cup and starry petals that arch back like ballet dancers. “Most graceful,” wrote McFarland in his 1938 best-seller Garden Bulbs in Color, and “just about perfection.” We think you’ll agree. 5 W-W, 14-16”, zones 5-8aS/10WC, from Holland. Last offered in 2005. We could special order it for you.
SIR WATKIN, 1868        
True stock! After decades of confusion by US experts (including us), here at last is the true ‘Sir Watkin’. One of the most celebrated daffodils of all time, “The Welsh Peerless” has soft yellow petals that arch forward gracefully around a fluted, golden cup. Almost 70 years after it first rocked the garden world, expert John Wister wrote that it “holds its place well among the best of fine daffodils, and proves once more that we cannot wholly cast aside old favorites.” 2 Y-Y, 16-18”, 5a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2013. We’ll offer it again as soon as bulbs are available. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
SOUTHERN QUEEN, 1927        
Don’t be confused! This rare beauty is NOT just for the South. Its name refers to the Southern Hemisphere — New Zealand to be exact — where it was bred by the esteemed Sir Algernon P.W. Thomas. With a frilled trumpet of an unusual, soft, “buff yellow” set against ivory white petals, it’s subtle but a favorite of ours — and we hope you’ll give it a try. 2W-Y, 16-18”, zones 5-8aS/10WC, from Holland. Last offered in 2009. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
SWANSDOWN, 1938        
As lovely as its name, this rare, creamy white double has a distinctive shape. Six single outer petals frame a short central rosette all ruffled and frilled like a tiny carnation. It was bred by one of the 20th-century’s greatest daffodil connoisseurs at Scotland’s romantic Brodie Castle, where you can still see it growing today. 4 W-W, 16-18”, zones 5-7S/9WC, from Holland. Last offered in 2005. We could special order it for you.
N. x intermedius, TEXAS STAR, 1816        
An enduring, cottage-garden classic in the South, this tough little wildflower was once painted by Redouté for Napoleon’s garden-loving Empress Josephine. It’s a wild cross of N. jonquilla and N. tazetta — so of course it’s fragrant — and through the years its many names have included ‘Etoile d’Or’ and “the Cowslip Cupped.” 13 Y-Y, 16-18”, zones 6b-8bS/10WC, from Texas. Last offered in 2010. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
VERGER, 1930        
Since the Middle Ages, mace-carrying vergers have led the grandest processions, hence the name of this majestic daffodil which looks like a pheasant’s-eye but blooms weeks earlier. With stainless petals and a cup as brilliant as a cathedral window, it’s a daffodil to look forward to year after year after year. 3W-R, 18-20”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2013. We’ll offer it again as soon as bulbs are available. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
VICTORIA, 1897        
Named for the Queen and “especially noted for its vanilla-like perfume,” this cream and gold Victorian trumpet was a favorite for decades in the flower markets of London (Kirby, 1909). Its petals are gracefully waved and its bright trumpet is richly frilled. In the 1920s, one bulb of ‘Victoria’ which bloomed with its trumpet split into strips became the beginning of modern split-corona daffodils. 1 W-Y, 18-20” early blooming, zones 5-7 from Holland. Last offered web-only in 2005. We hope to offer it again someday. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
VIREO, 1962        
“Nature’s first green is gold,” Robert Frost wrote, and it’s the vivid green deep in the cup of this great little jonquil that sets it apart, giving its lemony flowers a distinct, fresh, spring-time feeling. Named for a small, olive-green songbird, it was bred by America’s greatest daffodil breeder, Grant Mitsch, who was also an avid birder.7Y-GYY, 9-12” very late blooming, zones 6-8S/10WC, from Holland. Last offered in 2009. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
WILL SCARLETT, 1898        
The brilliant color of this groundbreaking daffodil so dazzled the world when it was first introduced that three bulbs sold for £100 — the equivalent today of over $10,000. Its petals are notoriously unruly, but as William Arnold wrote in 1921, “though a somewhat loosely put together flower, [it] is nevertheless very handsome.” Bred by the illustrious Rev. Engleheart, it’s well named for the youngest of Robin Hood’s Merry Men who is often depicted wearing red silk. 2 W-O, 21-23”, late-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2013. We’ll offer it again as soon as bulbs are available. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
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