Order these spring-planted bulbs NOW for delivery in APRIL 2016.

ENDURING PERENNIALS — Tough, beautiful, and diverse, heirloom iris thrive without care in old gardens and graveyards across America.

TO BLOOM THIS YEAR — Though iris are usually sold bare-root in summer and don’t bloom till the next, we ship freshly dug plants in April that, with good care and a bit of luck, may well bloom their first summer.

HISTORY & TIPS — Grown here since colonial days, iris became one of the “it” flowers of the Arts and Crafts era. They like full sun and well-drained soil. Learn more.

SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL        Sampler

We’re big fans of smaller iris. They’re graceful, charming, and — at about two feet tall — combine beautifully with other perennials near the front of a sunny border. We’ll send you 3 of our favorites (a few possibilities are pictured here), all different, labeled, freshly dug from our Ann Arbor micro-farms, and great for zones 3a-8a(10aWC). Iris care.

For 2, 3, or more of each, order additional samplers.

COS-37
1/$23
2/$44
3/$63
4/$81
5/$99
IMMORTAL IRIS        Sampler

Icons of the late-spring/early-summer garden, bearded iris are easy to grow and richly diverse. Give them full sun and average to well-drained soil and they’ll reward you for close to forever. We’ll send you 3 of our favorite heirlooms (a few possibilities are pictured here), all different, labeled, freshly dug from our Ann Arbor micro-farms, and great for zones 3a-8a(10aWC). Iris care.

For 2, 3, or more of each, order additional samplers.

COS-33
1/$23
2/$44
3/$63
4/$81
5/$99
ALCAZAR, 1910        New
This famous iris is not only magnificently handsome, it’s also “a survivor par excellence,” to quote expert Cameron Hall, growing vigorously in old gardens and forgotten places from coast to coast. Introduced by Vilmorin of France, it was one of the first tetraploids, setting a ground-breaking new standard – taller, larger-flowered, and richly colored – for 20th-century iris. 38-40”, zones 3-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Chart & care.
IR-38
1/$9.50
3/$26
5/$41
10/$76
25/$171
CAPRICE, 1898        
“‘I smell ripe grapes!’ cried a freckle-faced boy” in Ella McKinney’s 1927 Iris in the Little Garden — but it was actually this richly fragrant iris he smelled. It’s richly colored, too, a pure, deep, glowing rose that drew me like a beacon when I first saw it at our local Farmers Market many years ago. Just 24-26 inches tall, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Chart & care.
IR-18
1/$8.50
3/$23.50
5/$36.50
10/$68
25/$153
CORONATION, 1927        Rarest
The perfect yellow iris? Could be! It’s not too pale, not too bright, tough enough to thrive in total neglect, and it blooms and blooms – often after all the other iris here in our micro-farms have called it quits for the season. Introduced by Agnes Moore of tiny Benton, Illinois, it has become, in the words of iris expert Mike Unser, “truly an iris classic.” 28-36”, zones 3-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Chart & care.
IR-37
1/$7.50
3/$20.50
5/$32.50
10/$60
25/$135
CRIMSON KING, 1893        New
The deep, almost iridescent red-purple of this fragrant iris — which cameras fail to capture — dazzled the world when it was first introduced by the legendary Peter Barr. Its blooms are often the first of iris season, and in zone-6 and warmer gardens it often reblooms in the fall. In fact, it’s become “ubiquitous in coastal California,” writes Clarence Mahan in Classic Irises, “where its reblooming habit has given it a place in the hearts and flower beds of generations of gardeners.” Just 22-26” tall, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Chart & care.
IR-07
1/$8.50
3/$23.50
5/$36.50
10/$68
25/$153
FLORENTINA, 1500        
If I could grow only one iris, this might be it. Its color is a pale, luminous pewter — unique and ravishing. Its falls are long, like the ears of a basset hound. Its blooms kick off iris season. And its history is deep. Although modern scholars say it’s not the I. florentina or “white iris” of ancient times — now I. albicans — since at least the 1500s its rhizomes have been dried and sold as orris-root, a prized ingredient in herbal medicines and perfumery. Learn more here. Zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Chart & care.
IR-10
1/$9
3/$24.50
5/$39
10/$72
25/$162
FLUTTER-BY, 1924        New
With its lower petals held out at a jaunty angle, this profusely blooming little iris really does have the look of a host of butterflies. It was bred by the remarkable Grace Sturtevant of Massachusetts, a trained artist and “the world’s first woman plant hybridizer” (Mahan, 2007). Unfortunately, due to our very limited growing space we may not offer this little charmer again, so get it while you can! 24-26”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Chart & care.
IR-30
1/$9
3/$24.50
5/$39
10/$72
25/$162
GERMANICA, 1500        New
This iconic flower could be called the original bearded iris. Fragrant and tough, it was grown in ancient Rome, carried east on the Silk Road, and by 1629 was so widely planted in England that Parkinson called it “the common purple flower-de-luce.” It’s also the iris immortalized by Van Gogh in his masterpiece Irises which sold in 1987 for a record-setting $54 million. 30-36”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Chart & care.
IR-19
1/$9.50
3/$26
5/$41
10/$76
25/$171
GREAT LAKES, 1938        New
There’s a lot more to this iris than a great name. It’s Canadian-bred, so you know it’s tough, its stems are tall and sturdy, and its profuse, handsome flowers seem to reflect the summer sky. Winner of the Dykes Medal, it was “unquestionably the finest of all blue iris” for decades (Wayside, 1954). With a fragrance that’s been compared to magnolias, 36-40”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Chart & care.
IR-15
1/$8.50
3/$23.50
5/$36.50
10/$68
25/$153
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