Throughout our site, these treasures are highlighted with a green or purple bar and the word Rarest. Most you can’t get anywhere else in North America, and the rest you’d be very hard-pressed to find. That makes them extra-endangered — and extra-exciting in the garden.

CAPITALS indicate bulbs that are new or returned to our catalog after a hiatus.


Rarest for FALL 2016 Planting
Anne Frank, 1959 – with a vibrant heart, like Anne herself
April Queen, 1938 – bright, flame-kissed cup
Bath’s Flame, 1913 – one of Ron Scamp’s three favorites
Brilliancy, 1906 – luminous Arts-and-Crafts-era beauty
Broughshane, 1938 – amber-white Irish trumpet
Butter and Eggs, 1777 – the classic cottage-garden double
Daphne, 1914 – ADS 2008 Best Historic Daffodil
Early Pearl, 1899 – early, fragrant, and luminous
Emperor, 1869 – one of history’s Top Ten daffodils
Firetail, 1910 – is its cup truly RED?
Glory of Lisse, 1901 – one of the best of the poets
Golden Spur, 1885 – extra-early Victorian trumpet
Horace, 1894 – poet of carpe diem
Horn of Plenty, 1947 – long, dramatic bells
Jenny, 1943 – like miniature shooting stars
King Alfred, 1899 – true stock!
Little Witch, 1921 – cute perennializer with swept-back petals
Louise de Coligny, 1940 – sweet-scented apricot beauty
Lucifer, 1890 – heavenly wings, devilish cup
moschatus, 1604 – demurely nodding “Swan’s Neck”
Mrs. William Copeland, 1930 – Mary and Irene’s mother
Niveth, 1931 – Thalia’s elegant, uptown cousin
Orange Phoenix, Eggs & Bacon, 1731 – cottage-garden classic
Princeps, 1830 – graceful white and yellow wildling
Romance, 1959 – our most richly colored “pink”
Rose of May, 1950 – rose-like shape and fragrance
Sulphur Phoenix, Codlins and Cream, 1820 – Butter and Egg’s cousin
Twink, 1925 – a classic southern double
Vireo, 1962 – the jonquil named for a green songbird
White Lady, 1897 – Victorian lady with a parasol
Marie, 1860 – deepest indigo-purple
Roman Blue, 1562 – wildflowery, and it multiplies!
Roman Pink, 1573 – wildflowery, pink, and wonderful
Roman White, 1597 – finally, after decades of searching!
Absalon, 1780 – chocolate and chestnut on gold
Bacchus Bontlof, 1890 – wavy, cream-edged leaves
Black and White, 1920 – dark flames on creamy white
Blondine, 1956 – Do blondes really have more fun?
Bridesmaid, 1900 – slender cherry and ivory flame
Clara Butt, 1889 – once the world’s favorite
clusiana, 1607 – original WHITE & red
Columbine, 1929 – purple, lace-like tracery
Cottage Maid, 1857 – rose and white sweetheart
Demeter, 1932 – returns for years, vibrant rosy purple
Dom Pedro, 1906 – “undoubtedly the most attractive” brown tulip
Duchesse de Parma, 1820 – much more than red and yellow
Duc van Tol Red and Yellow, 1595 – ancient, landmark miniature
Duc van Tol Violet, 1700 – ancient pixie
Elegans Alba, 1895 – fragrant vanilla
Elsie Eloff, 1949 – pale butter yellow
Golden Harvest, 1928 – fresh, dewy yellow
Greuze, 1891 – rich, deep purple
Insulinde, 1914 – enjoy its enchanting transformation
James Wild, 1890 – gloriously amber-brown
Joost van de Vondel, 1850 – bold and intense
Koh-I-Noor, 1895 – dark, smoldering ruby
Lac van Rijn, 1620 – ancient crown of purple-red and ivory
Mabel, 1856 – barmaid’s delight?
Madras, 1913 – golden-bronze and fragrant
Mirella, 1953 – buff-rose and silvery pink
Mon Tresor Bontlof, 1875 – gold-edged, almost hosta-like leaves
Old Times, 1905 – garnet and primrose
Orange King, 1903 – “sweet-scented, a grand tulip”
Prince Albert, 1863 – lavender, pearl, and exceedingly rare
Prince of Austria, 1860 – fragrant and enduring
Princess Elizabeth, 1898 – lost for a decade, but now it’s back
Purperkroon, 1785 – dark purplish red, aka ‘The Moor’
Silver Standard, 1760 – dazzling red on white
The Lizard, 1903 – weird name, cool flower
Tournesol Red and Yellow, 1769 – voluptuous double
Vulcan, 1913 – ruddy relic named for . . . Spock?
Willemsoord, 1930 – double, ruffled, carmine-rose and pearl
Willem van Oranje, 1933 – Renoir coppery-peach
Zomerschoon, 1620 – true relic of Tulipomania
antique freesia, 1878 – super fragrant naturalizer
Rarest for SPRING 2017 Planting
Andries’ Orange, 1936 – flower arranger’s delight
atropurpurea, 1789 – wild original, dark and velvety
Clair de Lune, 1946 – elegant and wildflowery
Glorie van Heemstede, 1947 – a buttery yellow flower
Golden Heart, 1955 – warm sunburst of beauty
Gypsy Girl, 1947 – lavender-pink with a confetti of rubies
Jane Cowl, 1928 – undulating bronze
Lavender Chiffon, 1957 – cool, man, cool!
Lavengro, 1953 – soft, dreamy lavender
Lutt Wichen, 1941 – gardenia-flowered “ground-cover” dahlia
Mrs. I. De ver Warner, 1920 – saved by Kentucky farm family
Nepos, 1958 – baby-fresh masterpiece
Old Gold, 1947 – flickering like a bonfire
Preference, 1955 – peachy-pink with dark stems
Prince Noir, 1954 – ruffled, dark burgundy cactus
Prinzessin Irene von Preussen, 1912 – rare white, serene and charming
Rosemary Webb, 1956 – abundant, peony-like blooms
White Aster, 1879 – world’s oldest garden dahlia
Wisconsin Red, 1910? – pass-along ruby-red
York and Lancaster, 1915? – mysterious history
lemon lily, 1570 – fragrant daylily, true stock!
Ophir, 1924 – trumpet-shaped, American-bred pioneer
Orangeman, 1902 – mango-colored stars, extra old
Port, 1941 – small-flowered & glowing
Allegro, 1965 – rose-ruby with smoky undertones
Bibi, 1954 – vibrant pink and rose batik
Dauntless, 1940 – Lauren Bacall in pink
Green Lace, 1961 – daintily ruffled and cute as a button
Lilac & Chartreuse, 1960 – unique coloring
Lucky Star, 1966 – a truly fragrant glad!
Mexicana, 1967 – spring green and complex
Starface, 1960 – rapturously beautiful
Coronation, 1927 – the perfect yellow iris?
Her Majesty, 1903 – rose tapestry
Shannopin, 1940 – cream and rose
You might also like to check out our Customer Favorites, Web-Only bulbs, New This Year bulbs, and Back Soon or Lost Forever bulbs.
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