Our Spring-Planted Crown Jewels

Throughout our site, these treasures are highlighted with a green or purple bar and the word RAREST. Most you can’t get anywhere else in North America, and the rest you’d be very hard-pressed to find. That makes them extra-endangered — and extra-exciting in the garden.

Capitals indicate bulbs that are NEW or returned to our catalog after a hiatus.

Andries’ Orange, 1936 – flower arranger’s delight
atropurpurea, 1789 – wild original, dark and velvety
Clair de Lune, 1946 – elegant and wildflowery
Glorie van Heemstede, 1947 – a buttery yellow flower
Golden Heart, 1955 – warm sunburst of beauty
Gypsy Girl, 1947 – lavender-pink with a confetti of rubies
Jane Cowl, 1928 – undulating bronze
Lavender Chiffon, 1957 – cool, man, cool!
Lavengro, 1953 – soft, dreamy lavender
Lutt Wichen, 1941 – gardenia-flowered “ground-cover” dahlia
Mrs. I. De ver Warner, 1920 – saved by Kentucky farm family
Nepos, 1958 – baby-fresh masterpiece
Old Gold, 1947 – flickering like a bonfire
Preference, 1955 – peachy-pink with dark stems
Prince Noir, 1954 – ruffled, dark burgundy cactus
Prinzessin Irene von Preussen, 1912 – rare white, serene and charming
Rosemary Webb, 1956 – abundant, peony-like blooms
White Aster, 1879 – world’s oldest garden dahlia
Wisconsin Red, 1910? – pass-along ruby-red
York and Lancaster, 1915? – mysterious history
Allegro, 1965 – rose-ruby with smoky undertones
Bibi, 1954 – vibrant pink and rose batik
Dauntless, 1940 – Lauren Bacall in pink
Green Lace, 1961 – daintily ruffled and cute as a button
Lilac & Chartreuse, 1960 – unique coloring
Lucky Star, 1966 – a truly fragrant glad!
Mexicana, 1967 – spring green and complex
Starface, 1960 – rapturously beautiful
lemon lily, 1570 – fragrant daylily, true stock!
Ophir, 1924 – trumpet-shaped, American-bred pioneer
Orangeman, 1902 – mango-colored stars, extra old
Port, 1941 – small-flowered & glowing
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